Size May Not Matter – But Time Does

Wake Up.

Pour caffeine into my face.

Wait 20 minutes.

Begin day.

Does this sound like the start of your day? Cause it is basically how every day starts for me. When I was younger there were more steps in the beginning of my day, whether it was eating breakfast (now that doesn’t happen until about 4 hours after I wake up), working out (that is now every other day), or, taking my supplements (now I take my supplements at noon and about 5pm). I want to talk about why I started taking my supplements towards the middle and end of my day here.

Part of the reason I switched was because taking so many pills all at once on an empty stomach really upset me, and made it hard to focus for about an hour after taking them. But the more significant reason is that I learned the time of day matters when taking anything that your body digests, whether supplement, medication or really even food. Once you stop and think about it, which I never did, it makes a lot of sense. The body takes a few hours to process whatever you consume, and then that takes a further amount of time (varies by compound), to build up to its full effectiveness.

For instance, a Kansas State study found that acid reflux medicine nearly twice as many people saw a dramatic reduction in their symptoms when they took their daily medication around dinnertime. This is because acid tends to build up as you eat, and peak shortly before bed, so taking medicine in the morning has significantly less impact than taking it when acid is near its high point.

Freedom is an anti-inflammation supplement, and research has shown that individuals benefit most from anti-inflammation drugs and supplements when taken at specific times. Those times vary depending on the source of inflammation.

Individuals suffering from osteoarthritis (like me), or other forms of inflammation that are the result of ‘use’ (exercise/other activities) have their symptoms peak in the evening. A Texas Tech University study found that the optimum time for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory interventions (supplements, ibuprofen…etc) is between about noon and 4pm. This allows the compound time to digest and reach its highest blood levels around the time you would be experiencing peak inflammation.

Sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammation from autoimmune diseases see their worst inflammation in the morning, and according to the same Texas Tech study, benefit most from taking their anti-inflammation drugs/supplements as close to bedtime as practical, in order to prevent overnight inflammation growth.

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